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Matt Sacheli with a research participant on a stationary bike.
Exercise “rewires” the brain, may improve motor function and mood in PD Oct 15, 2019

Pictured: graduate student Matthew Sacheli with a research participant. Image credit: Don Erhardt/UBC Faculty of Medicine.

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A celebration of music by the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health Movement Disorders Clinic team.
A hub for brain wellness to launch at UBC this fall Sep 30, 2019

Image source: Dr. Silke Cresswell.

Every so often, piano music fills the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health. From students who sit down to spend a musical moment away from the lab, to people who reside in long-term care at UBC Hospital finding a few minutes for a song, the piano has been a bright spot for our community. It is nice on its own, but it serves a larger purpose; a little music here and there has a lot to do with improving the wellbeing of our clinic visitors, staff, students, and researchers.

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Dr. Weihong Song in his lab.
Newly discovered gene function may reduce cell death in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome Aug 27, 2019

The discovery of a new role for a gene associated with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders finds possible prenatal origin for Alzheimer disease (AD), according to a study published today in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

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A group of older adults in group physical therapy.
FAME for NEUROFITNESS program at UBC clinic merges physical therapy and research Aug 23, 2019

A new UBC Physical Therapy & Research Clinic for people with neurological conditions has opened across the street from the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, offering people living with movement disorders, stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS) access to a group exercise program tailored to their specific needs.

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Dr. Weihong Song and Dr. Yun Zhang.
Protein meant to protect cells may also serve as a biomarker for Alzheimer disease Jul 23, 2019

Pictured: Dr. Weihong Song (left) with Dr. Yun Zhang (right), co-first author on the paper described below. Image credit: Paul Joseph/UBC.

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Older man sleeping peacefully.
Resetting circadian rhythms can improve sleep quality in people at risk for dementia Jul 15, 2019

Can improving sleep quality protect older adults from cognitive decline? New research presented today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) suggests that improving circadian regulation by “resetting” an individual’s biological clock can improve sleep quality in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

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Jasmine Gill and Dr. Cheryl Wellington with the SIMOA HD-1 Analyzer at UBC.
Changes in the brain apparent in the blood in new TBI biomarker study Jun 26, 2019

Pictured: Dr. Cheryl Wellington (right) with graduate student Jasmine Gill (left) with the Simoa HD-1 Analyzer in the Wellington lab at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health. Image credit: Paul Joseph/UBC.

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Dr. Julie Robillard
New CCNA funding to support UBC researchers Jun 18, 2019

This week, the Government of Canada announced the next phase of funding for the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA). From 2019 to 2024, CCNA will receive $46 million from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and 11 other partner organizations.

Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health (DMCBH) researchers have received a $540,000 investment from CCNA; there are 13 CCNA-affiliated researchers at DMCBH, five of whom have leadership roles, highlighting the centre’s depth of expertise in dementia:

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Dr. Tony Traboulsee counsels a patient.
Better patient engagement, a patient’s perspective Jun 10, 2019

Pictured: Dr. Anthony Trabouslee. Image credit: Paul Joseph/UBC.

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Man plays game on iPad after a workout.
Cognitive training tools show benefit in improving cognition after exercise Jun 7, 2019

In 2031, nearly one in four Canadians will be aged 65 or older. As Canada’s population ages, it will be important to establish evidence-based, inexpensive, non-pharmaceutical interventions to slow the effects of aging on cognition and mobility. New research from Lisanne ten Brinke, a PhD candidate in Dr.

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